Places To Explore In Medellin, Colombia

15 Places To Visit In Medellin, Colombia

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Places To Visit In Medellin, Colombia

Medellin, Colombia‘s second-largest city, has changed more than any other city on the planet. Though the city’s violent and chaotic past is well-known, it is now contemporary, inventive, and simply stunning. For its virtually ideal weather, the city is known as the “City of Eternal Spring,” so here we will talk about the places to visit in Medellin. Also, there are many parks and plazas where you can relax in the sun with fresh juice from a street food seller and a couple of empanadas. 

Stay here to learn about must-see places to visit in Medellin!


Palacio de la Cultura Rafael Uribe Uribe

Because you’ll be visiting the Plaza Botero, you won’t be able to escape viewing this one-of-a-kind and intimidating structure. You’ve probably never seen anything like its elaborate and befuddling black and white facade. The architect who designed it was so widely chastised for his work that he quit, and the city completed it in an entirely different style (as you’ll see). If it’s open, go inside to see the gorgeous courtyard with its fountain and gardens if it’s available.

Palacio de la Cultura Rafael Uribe Uribe

 


Museo de Arte Moderno Medellín

This modest but edgy museum, a remarkable piece of modern architecture, houses contemporary artwork by Colombian and other Latin American artists. DESPITE ITS SMALL SIZE, the MAMM has various permanent and temporary exhibits, including paintings, movies, sculptures, and 3D works, both inside and out. Because modern art isn’t for everyone, the museum does a superb job explaining each piece. The gift shop sells highly unique items created by artists, and the theatre periodically screens movies. There’s a lovely balcony with city views, as well as a restaurant downstairs where you may get a drink.

Museo de Arte Moderno Medellín

 


Comuna 13

The government and local artists have teamed together to make Comuna 13 a better place to live. It was once a section of the city you’d never consider visiting. The inclusion of bright artwork, escalators, and additional security measures has brought the community closer and opened the district up to tourism. Only locals would consider hiking the steep slopes to reach Comuna 13, but the inclusion of escalators as a social and democratic infrastructure has made it more approachable. Visit to view the various murals, people, police officers, colorful hillside houses, and changes here. This is a must place to visit in Medellin. 

 

Comuna 13

 


 El Castillo Museo 

Is it true that Medellín has a castle? Yes, for a bit of cost, you may tour this 20th-century castle with its French-inspired gardens, fountains, and walks. Take a tour of the inside, including four-poster beds, a porcelain collection, and a massive dining room table. It was erected in 1930 and established as a museum in 1971, although it functioned as a luxurious residence and a venue for hosting European high society guests in the meantime.

 El Castillo Museo 


Plaza Botero

Check out the bustling Plaza Botero for some larger-than-life sculptures by the square’s namesake, Fernando Botero, a terrific site for people-watching and art appreciation. The artist himself contributed all 23 sensuous bronze figures strewn over the plaza. Before or after visiting the Museo de Antioquia, it’s an excellent location to wander around or relax with a fresh juice or empanada from one of the street sellers. Street entertainers, trinket dealers, and food booths can be found all around the region, transforming an otherwise run-down portion of town.

Plaza Botero

 


 Guatapé

It’s a must-do day excursion from Medellín, but it’s much better if you have an extra night or two. Guatapé is a lovely, colorful lake village located approximately two hours outside the metropolis. Take photographs of the colorfully painted exteriors of residences in this area, and pay a visit to the Plaza de Zocalos, Colombia’s most colorful town plaza. You’ll find affordable street delicacies like empanadas and churros along the lake and throughout town, and restaurants will serve you lots of freshly cooked lake trout and fish soup. Climbing the 700 stairs up El Peñol, a massive rock is the most popular activity in town for an incredible view of the islands and ocean below.

 

 Guatapé

 


Casa de la Memoria

This museum is heartbreaking, illuminating, and enjoyable, and it’s a must-see for anybody interested in learning more about Colombia’s dramatic and terrible history. From drug cartels and gangs to a horrific civil war, Casa de la Memoria aspires to raise the voices of victims and preserve their history so that we may learn more about it and prevent repeating the mistakes of the past. The entire area is well-curated, with interactive exhibitions, evocative photography, and artwork that will enlighten and move you.

 

Casa de la Memoria

 


Parque Explora

Even grownups and others who do not have children enjoy Parque Explora. It’s a scientific museum featuring an aquarium that’s the largest in South America. In addition to a planetarium, 3D theatre, and a television studio, the building’s four red cubes feature approximately 290 interactive exhibits. It’s simple to spend a whole day here playing and learning about science and technology. It’s also a convenient stop on your route to other sights because it’s located in Zona Norte between botanical gardens and retail malls. Parque Explora is fascinating and entertaining, and you’ll have an even better time if you bring your children.

 

 

Parque Explora

 


The Botanical Garden

The city’s botanical gardens are a natural oasis in the heart of Medellín, with over 900 types of fauna and 4000 flowers. A butterfly garden, a cactus garden, and an extensive collection of orchids are attractions. Entry is free, and you may go exploring the area for creatures or relax on the grass with a book in the sun. The Orquideorama, a 64-foot-high wooden mesh structure that collects rainfall and protects the orchids and butterflies below, is also there. Have a picnic, look for live music, and visit if you’re in town for the city’s Flower Festival; it’ll be much more spectacular. 

 

jardín botánico


Biblioteca España

On your route up and down the metro cable, you’ll pass through a handful of the city’s poorest neighbourhoods. It’s a real glimpse at living in these vibrant areas that were once amid a conflict. It’s acceptable to stop in Santo Domingo during the day to take a look around – perhaps get a drink and some fried chicken and arepas from one of the little local eateries. Many visitors also stop by the Biblioteca España, an extensive, contemporary library made of black slate that has evolved into a local community center.

Biblioteca España

 

 


Parque Arvi

Medellín’s metro and metrocable systems have gotten a lot of appreciation for connecting the city’s many varied communities. With your metro ticket, you may go all around the city, and if you want to get higher for better views and fresh air, spend a little extra to ride the metrocable from Santo Domingo to Parque Arvi. The 15-minute ride offers spectacular views of the city and surrounding regions. There are spots to stop at the summit for some refreshments prepared from Colombian goods while taking in the views. Explore the park’s walking pathways after checking out the tents and street sellers selling goods.

 

 

 

Parque Arvi

 

 


 Museo de Antioquia

This ancient city hall has been converted into a museum with a fantastic collection of Fernando Botero’s art. He was one of Colombia’s most well-known painters, and he had a thing for fat people. The artist, born in Medellín, supported his local museum by contributing several of the paintings himself. According to the guides, start on the top level with his older works and work your way down to discover his progress as an artist. The museum also has pieces by foreign artists on display, and an audio guide is available if you wish to learn more. You may take a rest here at the little café and courtyard.

 

 Museo de Antioquia

 


Salsa Dancing is a fun way to spend an evening.

This city is the place to learn whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting. While Cali maybe Colombia’s salsa capital, Medellín can help you get started with salsa lessons or local restaurants and clubs that include salsa music and dance. DanceFree in Poblado is a popular spot for private or group classes, and they also offer a bar with dancing on weekends.

salsa dancing

 


Parque Lleras

Poblado is one of Medellín’s most popular nightlife districts, and Parque Lleras is frequently where residents and visitors alike begin their evenings. It’s a little park surrounded by trees where merchants sell art daily, and hordes of people drink at night. There are often young people there because the park is flanked by pubs, restaurants, and clubs and is near to many of the area’s hostels. So grab a bottle of Aguardiente, a Colombian anise-flavoured liquor, or a couple of Aguila beers and walk to this bustling park to unwind before heading out.

provenza

 


Go to a Fútbol Game

Soccer in South America is comparable to religion, attracting fervent and devoted supporters to stadiums to watch their favorite teams compete. Medellín is no exception, and if you want to enjoy a sporting event that serves as a cultural experience, check out one of the city’s teams. The two local clubs are Atlético Nacional and Independiente Medelln, with tickets ranging from $11 to $26 USD. Buy them a few days ahead of time and seek recommendations on where to sit based on whether you want things to be boisterous or peaceful. Even if you’re not a soccer lover, the raucous spectators, singing, chanting, banners, and even firecrackers going off during games are a one-of-a-kind experience.

estadio medellin

 


We hope you’ve enjoyed the places to visit in Medellin!





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